Tegirenai Grammar


Foreword


Tegirenai, originally Tigerian, was my first serious attempt at a conlang, and as such has a grammar very similar to English, with some influences from Spanish. At the time when I began the work, I knew very little about how different languages work in terms of their grammar and syntax, but over the years I have at least attempted to coax it into something like a respectable language.

The grammar below is one I expect to be in a state of constant flux and improvement as I work to refine ideas begun fifteen years ago and flesh out areas of syntax and methods of expression I either never thought about or never bothered to address.

One notable feature about Tegirenai is the fact that most words have suffixes to show their part of speech. This was done very early on, in an attempt to make the language seem ordered and more understandable from the perspective of someone making it as he went along. All the same, it is at least a sometimes useful feature, and if nothing else gives the language some manner of character.

The other notable concept I introduced, while creating Tigerian, was that of the Tigerian Language Council, a fictional body in Tegireserana charged with protecting and tending the language. At times their "improvements" to the language are thoroughly sensible and necessary, but at other times some of their decisions show that perhaps they were not all experts in linguistics. Partially (or perhaps mostly) this is to cover for my own faults; for the rest, remember that this (as all conlangs) is a work constantly under construction.

 

Nouns - Çanasin


Nouns in Tegirenai are known as shanasin, or "names." Common nouns in Tegirenai end with the suffix -na in the singular form, hence their common alternate term nasin. Proper nouns often also end with -na, with the exception of personal names or inflected nouns (e.g. Jonatha, Tegirenai).

Plurals

Nouns are made plural with the addition of the suffix -sin. E.g. matena (matena) "friend", matenasin (matenasin) "friends".

Verbals

 

Pronouns - Nieraçenasin


Pronouns in Tegirenai are called nierashanasin from the verb nierane, "to replace," and shana, "name/noun." They carry no part-of-speech suffix.

Personal Pronouns

 Nominative/
Accusative
Genitive
Singular
Genitive
Plural
Reflexive
First-person
singular
ha
ha
han
han
hanen
hanen
na
na
Second-person
singular
hea
hea
hean
hean
heanen
heanen
nea
nea
Third-person
singular
Masculinehir
hir
hiren
hiren
hirenen
hirenen
nir
nir
Femininehin
hin
hinen
hinen
hinenen
hinenen
nin
nin
Neuterheran
heran
heran
heran
heran
heran
neran
neran
First-person
plural
hao
hao
haon
haon
haonen
haonen
nao
nao
Second-person
plural
hea
hea
heanin
heanin
heanin
heanin
nea
nea
Third-person
plural
hun
hun
hunen
hunen
hunenen
hunenen
nun
nun

Demonstrative/Interrogative Pronouns


Demonstratives
 Nominative/AccusativeGenitive
Proximalthisshua
çua
shuan
çuan
theseshun
çun
shunen
çunen
hereshuraha
çuraha
shurahan
çurahan
Distalthaton
on
onen
onen
thoseos
os
osen
osen
thereoraha
oraha
orahan
orahan

Verbs

Person Conjugation

 

Tense Conjugation

 

Adjectives and Adverbs

 

Prepositional Phrases

 

Sentence Structure


Simple Sentences

Tegirenai sentences follow a Subject-Verb-Object (SVO) pattern:

San nemena rusilesani ina firilesana.
San nemena rusilesani ina firilesana.
The boy reads a book.

Where a prepositional phrase acts as the object of a verb, it also follows it:

San nemina talini ton hinen tehana.
San nemina talini ton hinen tehana.
The woman walks to her house.

Haon maituna arudinin þalie Miþaragona.
Haon maituna arudinin thalie Mitharagona.
Our guest came from Mitharagona.

When multiple prepositional phrases describe a verb, they are listed in the following order: means, company, purpose, direction, target, time, opinion:

Hean arena talinin turan san taielana firian hirenen matenasin þalie Hirona ton haon tehana turan hidearehana lor haonen sucanasin.
Hean arena talinin turan san taielana firian hirenen matenasin thalie Hirona ton haon tehana turan hidearehana lor haonen sucanasin.
Your brother walked on the road, with his friends, for dinner, from Hirona, to our house, on yesterday, per our hopes.

Compound Sentences

 

All content ©2004–2011 JT the Ninja. Contact jt AT jttheninja DOT com (if you dare).
Fonts used on this page: Museo, Museo Sans, Calluna, and Calluna Sans.